THE WAXOPOLITAN

Pro Esthetician Waxing 101

03 Mar, 21

Pro Esthetician Waxing 101

 

If you’re an esthie wanting to learn how to become a wax specialist, there is a lot more to it than professional wax alone. Starting a waxing business can be psychologically and emotionally draining. Working with clients, raising your service prices, or leading employees can take a toll on your soft skills like communication, setting boundaries, or managing stress. With everything that’s being thrown your way, strengthening things like coping skills, knowing how to ask for help, or knowing your worth can make the difference between being just an esthetician waxing or a presence people want to support (including your staff). 


In this article, we give you a few tips on strengthening your soft skills to boost your confidence—and your bank account. We dive into things concerning managing stress while starting a business, taking responsibility for both your mistakes and your wins, and knowing your worth—even when you don’t. 


Fair warning, we’re about to get meta.



How to manage stress while starting a business

As soon as you start your waxing training, you’ve gotta learn to breathe...slowly, for like six seconds in and six seconds out with your mouth closed. It doesn’t always have to be that deep but nice, long, and slow. Long, slow, closed mouth breathing tells the body that’s it’s safe. When breathing quickens due to stress, or anxiety is when the body might be heading into fight or flight mode. This can lead to us becoming defensive, avoidant, passive-aggressive, or aggressive-aggressive with clients, employees, or vendors, for example. Practice six-second breathing exercises when you’re relaxed, like when you first wake up or before bed for as many rounds as you can. Even as little as four rounds of breaths can start putting the body into safe mode. 



The trick is paying attention to when we’re stressed, agitated, or upset at the first sign before it snowballs into rumination, a panic attack, or behaving in a way that we aren’t proud of. When you become conscious of fear or frustrating thoughts, it’s OK to say things along the lines of “shhh, it’s OK, you’re safe, I love you, I’m here,” or whatever you need to tell yourself to bring it back to center in a compassionate way. 



Survival of the fittest was never about physical strengths but about being the most adaptable. This is where that breathing stuff comes in. We practice breathing when we’re chill so that it’s easier to breathe, be present, and adapt to a situation where we feel the slightest threat. A perceived threat for a wax technician can be when a client complains about a service, or when we have to correct an employee, or when someone is challenging us. When we are focused and breathing slowly, we are getting in front of ourselves in order to respond with ability (responsibility) instead of just reacting so that we can adapt to any situation with as much grace as possible.




Taking accountability and responsibility

You’ve got to know your strengths and be honest (but EXTREMELY compassionate) with yourself about what needs finessing and what needs downright sculpting within you and your skills. I.e., your weaknesses. One can compare “flaws” or “weaknesses” to uncovering earth-covered gems that just need polishing. Sometimes it’s scary, most people don’t like to be “the bad guy", or wrong about something, but when someone corrects or challenges us, or a situation scares us, how can we meet it from a perspective of trying to understand than to immediately go into fight or flight mode? How do we stand up, own our mistakes, and be accountable and responsible for when we fall short of who we want to be?


Many like to avoid conflict at all costs, sweep issues under the rug or justify, deny and deflect (or even gaslight or worse) when being confronted with a mistake we’ve made. We identify so strongly as being right and unflawed, that when someone holds a mirror up to us, we see our flaws as an attack or personal failing. Alternatively, when someone tells us that we have something in our teeth, we might feel silly, but we find a mirror, check to see the damage, and remove it, hopefully, without embarrassment. It’s the same when owning our faux pas; we accept the new information someone is telling us (or info we weren’t previously conscious of), analyze the situation, and see about removing the proverbial spinach from our teeth. Don’t let the ego hold you back from growth. The goal shouldn’t just be about becoming a wax technician but also who you’ll become in the process.



You have to believe that you’re worthy of good things.

As an esthetician waxing, it’s essential to believe that you’re worthy of good clients, good relationships, and loving connections with people. This job is about giving the best, but you can’t give the best from a place of lack or a deficit of believing you are worthy. You want to give from a place of abundance and belief that you are deserving of the best. Acknowledging self-worth is also a skill or practice that can be fine-tuned. Life may have brainwashed us into believing otherwise, but you are worthy AF. Here’s how to know it.


Many people believe their self-worth comes from their abilities, performance, looks, or even social media following (external factors). We may not even believe it when told that our worth or value is not determined by what we do but simply because we’re human. And even when we’ve checked all the external boxes (I’ve got the best waxing training, I stay educated and updated on all-things skin, I use the best professional wax), we can’t even fathom raising our prices or even firing a client for habitually crossing our boundaries. 


As we breathe and practice being present more, it’s easier to identify our inner critic or catch ourselves before attending our own pity party. And just like when we are confronted with being wrong, it’s OK to challenge the negative thoughts. Ask if the unworthy thinking has any basis. Even asking ourselves, “Is this true?” can be enough to stop the downward spiral of feeling unworthy. Giving the different voices in our head names can also act as a marker to challenge our thinking. “Oh, this is negative Nancy over here, or that’s my mother’s voice right there.” 


Here is where fake it till you make it can make sense. Start blessing the good things in your life right now and say, “I deserve and appreciate that.” How would it feel to believe that 100%? What does a worthy person feel like? How does a worthy person act? Sit with it these thoughts and try to embody what you think worthiness feels like for at least 30 seconds. Literally, practice feeling worthy. If you do need to use external markers, think about all of the challenges you have overcome. Say to yourself with emotion. “I am responsible, and I am capable.” While you’re building your worthiness factor, you can even shift your thinking onto your business. My business is worthy of charging these prices, my business can’t afford to keep this client who often misses their appointment. You have chosen a career that’s sole purpose is to make others feel good about themselves. You are a gift—so act (and charge) like you know it.



You will always be learning.

You will never know everything, be humble. Always keep up with the latest waxing training, scientific skin discoveries, and personal development. I’ve been an esthetician for 17 years, and I’m still deep in personal, spiritual, or technical development. Currently, I’ve been spending a little bit of time each day or week listening to a cognitive psychology book about managing anxiety, with an abundance alignment program I’m enrolled in, a Pinterest course, and a Danessa Myricks advanced makeup in photography course. As Abraham Hicks says, “You can never get it wrong because you can never get it done.” You will always be learning and discovering new things about your strengths, weaknesses, and the professional wax game. Keep yourself open to learning new things even when it’s uncomfortable or proves you’ve been “doing it wrong this whole time?!”


And as far as waxing is concerned, start by apprenticing at the top waxing spot in your area. Find the best to lead you and start by setting the bar high! Scare yourself by applying to every spot—especially the ones you would never think would hire you in a million years! Proclaim it right now, “I work for and with the best!” “Only the best things are looking for me!” 


If you can, take classes, watch as many YouTube videos, read blogs like this, read as many books on waxing and the skin that you can, get all the knowledge you can, and never, never stop learning!


Resources

Your Salon Glow Up Guide


Research the following topics 

  • How to talk about money
  • How to charge for your services
  • How to feel comfortable selling your products and yourself.
  • How to manage staff


Final thoughts.

Blue hard wax dripping down a spatula onto a wax warmer

Remember, you are more than just an esthetician waxing clients; you are offering a very intimate service to many different types of people. At the same time as learning how to become a wax specialist, dive deep into your interpersonal and soft skills if you haven’t already. Following a path of personal development can lead to massive dividends on your professional and personal life. 


How can Starpil help you with your waxing business? We do more than offer professional waxing products for hair removal; we offer mentorship programs and are just a call or DM away!


 

Join the #STARPILFAM

  • To get The Waxopolitan in your inbox, subscribe here for all the fun! 
  • Get all the Starpil hook-ups with Esthie Bucks for rewards on your favorite waxing products.
  • Join other professional #starpilfam members in The World of Waxing, our Facebook Group. (Have your license ready).
  • Follow us on Instagram @starpilwaxUSA for all of the up-to-the-minute waxing trends, Starpil news, and earn free Esthie Bucks.
  • Call us at 1-866-972-2999 or live chat with a Starpil representative from 9:30 AM - 5:30 PM EST.
  • Email us at info@starpilwax.com and put PAM REQUEST in the subject line or contact us here.